toocatsoriginals:

Major Mariam Al Mansouri, the United Arab Emirate’s first female fighter pilot, flew in the recent multi-national strikes against ISIS. Maj. Mansouri, 35, a 2007 graduate of Khalifa bin Zayed Air College, flies Emirati Air Force Block 60 F-16’s.

via The National (1, 2)

(via scifigamingmom)

artigosaurus:

queen-of-dork:

i-am-a-cat-eins-zwei-drei:

debisanacronym1:

WHY ARE NONE OF YOU FUCKERS FLIPPING SHIT?!?

NASA HAS DECLARED PLUTO A PLANET AGAIN

IT HAS MOONS!!!!! IT HAS MOONS!!!!!!!

WHAT. WHAT! PLUTO YOU FUCKING DID IT!

VIVA LA PLUTO, YOU DID IT!!!

(via berthalpz)

kingkaneda:

POTC - Shipping
I don’t know. It started out okay.

kingkaneda:

POTC - Shipping

I don’t know. It started out okay.

(via summerseachild)

asker

Anonymous asked: I keep seeing people say things like "oh what special snowflakes! They only want a label so they can say they're oppressed like the rest of us!" When for me, when I found out I was demisexual, it was more like I had a sense of identity. It just hurts

demigray:

lillivati:

demigray:

Yeah, this is what happens when people don’t listen to others. If the people who put down demisexuality actually read about the experiences of most demisexuals, they would realize that they’re just like you and only a handful of us claim to be oppressed. Instead they go for easy targets.

Yeah, I’ve never felt oppressed, but alienated- I’ve felt that lots of times.  Sometimes it seems like everyone centers the quality of their relationships on the sexual portions, and that’s like- sex is kind of whatever for me, it’s nice but I don’t see what the big deal is, and I probably wouldn’t miss it if I couldn’t have it anymore.  And there are a lot of people who draw a line from that statement to totally unrelated assumptions like “well, you must not really love your husband, then”.  That’s demoralizing.  And it’s offensive.  And it makes you feel really alone and like you have to play along all the time in public.

Being able to put words to what you are is critically important.  If there is not even a word for how you feel in your language, it becomes that much harder to avoid believing that there is something fundamentally broken inside you, or that there isn’t anyone else like you in the world.  Having a word defeats those destructive thoughts.

Well said.

science-and-things:

hlaar:

So I’ve heard somebody wanted to see a gif of that moment when Brian Cox was ran over by Stephen Hawking. Here it is, I hope it loads.


This gif changed my life

science-and-things:

hlaar:

So I’ve heard somebody wanted to see a gif of that moment when Brian Cox was ran over by Stephen Hawking. Here it is, I hope it loads.

This gif changed my life

(via nommasaurusrex)

Writers don’t write from experience, though many are resistant to admit that they don’t. I want to be clear about this. If you wrote from experience, you’d get maybe one book, maybe three poems. Writers write from empathy.

Nikki Giovanni (via word-spinning)

if I wrote only from experience everything would be about being stuck at bus stations in Eastern European countries and yelling at teenagers to be quiet.

(via meetcute-s)

(via riptidepublishing)

What I remember most about emotional abuse is that it’s like being put in a box. How you end up in there is the biggest trick – I never managed to work that one out. Maybe you think it’s a treasure box at first: you’re in there because you’re special. Soon the box starts to shrink. Every time you touch the edges there is an “argument”. So you try to make yourself fit. You curl up, become smaller, quieter, remove the excessive, offensive parts of your personality – you begin to notice lots of these. You eliminate people and interests, change your behaviour. But still the box gets smaller. You think it’s your fault. The terrible, unforgivable too-muchness of you is to blame. You don’t realise that the box is shrinking, or who is making it smaller. You don’t yet understand that you will never, ever be tiny enough to fit, or silent enough to avoid a row

It’s time to make emotional abuse a crime - Lauren Laverne (via ninja-suffragette)

holy fucking shit this exactly what happened to me

(via mstrhvntr)

(via kinickienoodle)

when you want to go to bed but stargate universe comes on in six minutes

rachelhaimowitz:

OGOD THANK YOU.

rachelhaimowitz:

OGOD THANK YOU.

(via riptidepublishing)

asker

Anonymous asked: have you seen stargate universe? is it any good?

dorothyoz39:

chevronlocked:

Hello, anon! I watched the first half to three quarters of s1 of SGU as it was airing and then gave up. I, personally, could not stand it at all. It was completely lacking in everything that made me like SG-1 and SGA so much. The characters, the camaraderie on the teams, the humor, THOSE were the things that made me connect so deeply with this series. And unfortunately SGU really didn’t have any of those things going for it. I couldn’t stand anyone in the cast, there was a BUNCH of dumb interpersonal drama I didn’t care for (that gifset floating around comparing 200’s teen team to SGU was a lot of fandom’s reaction, there were so many Stargate 90210 jokes lol), there’s lots of consent and relationship issues in Stargate but SGU stepped it up a notch and continuously creeped me out with people using the communication stones and having sex in other people’s bodies, and the show took itself way too seriously. Stargate’s tongue-in-cheek humor and ability to make fun of itself was one of my favorite things about it. SGU felt like it was trying to be Battlestar Galactica but managed to completely miss the mark (although I never finished that show either). I heard the second season was better, but I didn’t like it enough to keep going.

Even though they canceled SGA for SGU to move forward, I really wanted to like SGU. I’m a Stargate fan, of course I want to like as much of the franchise as possible. I was SO EXCITED when it premiered and I really wanted to fall in love with it like I did the other shows. Even after the producers told us they didn’t care about the existing fanbase and were looking to draw in a new, younger demographic, and then BLAMED US when the show failed. That’s on you, guys. You deliberately created a show that was radically different from your others and that lacked the elements that made those shows so successful. You can’t say you’re looking for different viewers and then get mad at us when we ditch you for coming out with a product we don’t care for. Also the arguments that people ~boycotted~ SGU because of SGA, I never met anyone who did that. Everyone I knew gave SGU a shot, although most didn’t finish it.

This… went on a tangent, lol. Anyway, I would say try it for youself! You might like it, tastes vary. The first few episodes were indicative of the tone of the show for as much as I watched, but everyone I know who finished it said it improved a lot in s2.

chevronlocked described my feelings about SGU so well…. The stones thing was in fact what made me stop watching, without it, I may have given them a few more episodes, maybe even an entire season. As it was I stopped after only a few episodes. I gave up after Young visits his wife in the other colonel’s body and sleeps with her… that’s when I just said, ‘nope, Mallozzi & Co + this shit, nope’

Well, allow me to represent the other perspective. I’m a long term SG1 fan who loved SGU and who now counts SGU as their favourite Stargate. It’s true that it’s a very different kind of show from SG1 and SGA, but that struck me as a good thing, since why would you want the same thing over and over again when you could complement it with something a bit different?

SGU is more ‘realistic’ than its stable mates. It’s characters are flawed and sometimes self-defeating, and they don’t immediately get to grips with the problems in front of the and solve them in time for the end of the episode. They argue, they sabotage each other, they have personal problems back on Earth that negatively affect their attempts to survive on Destiny, etc etc, and much of the time those plot threads do impact the whole ‘people lost in space trying to work out how to fly a half-ruined spaceship while pursued by hostile aliens’  storyline.

Also a lot of the problems they face are more ‘realistic’ - there’s a whole episode where they have to find chalk for the air scrubbers. That’s not exactly glamourous, but it’s terribly likely. There’s something satisfyingly hard SF about addressing the real necessities of life in outer space, like where you get air and water from. And about addressing the real problems of life stuck together on a disintegrating ship you don’t know how to operate - one of those real problems is always going to be the other people you’re stuck out there with.

IDK, I’m not doing a good job of explaining the appeal here. Yes, it is more drama-ish. Yes, it is much more unhappy. But it’s also somehow a lot more believable to me. And also it’s fascinating. It begins with all kinds of things that look worryingly cliched, like Greer as the Angry Black Man and Chloe, Eli and Scott as the love triangle, and you think it’s going to be awful… and then they subvert it in interesting ways.

And there are riffs on themes in the other shows too. You know? Jack and Daniel, McKay and Sheppard, they start off not trusting each other, but they rapidly and easily get to the stage where they’re inseparable brothers in arms and the series is partly about that bond… But what if it didn’t happen? What if they carried on distrusting each other and it just got worse? SGU answers that question with Rush and Young.

And you know, Jack O’Neill starts out in the movie as a depressed and washed up old soldier bowed by personal tragedy - but he gets over it in half an hour. What would be more likely to happen, if you’re forcing someone in the grip of untreated depression back into a command they turned down because they felt they couldn’t do it any more? Welcome to Young with his anger management issues and his terrible decision making and his slow descent into drinking problems. 

There are things it shares with its older siblings too, for example the belief that nothing can go right until people get over themselves and start working together. The ‘misfits forced together into peril become a family’ theme is strong with this one - and as someone whose family was pretty dysfunctional, I find the SGU one more - again, realistic - than the SG1.

And it’s not humourless at all. It’s just that its humour is quieter and dryer and not delivered in wisecracks. But say ‘Thus spake Zarathustra’ or ‘sizeable spiders’ to an SGU fan and I guarantee they’ll laugh.

I concur with the whole ‘try it yourself’ thing, but I would say ‘take it for what it is and don’t try to make it into another SG1’. IMO what it is is really really good hard SF drama, and it’s a shame to miss out on enjoying that just because you’re expecting something else.

defeatingexistence:

clockmocker:

A water balloon full of mercury hitting the ground (X)

SCIENCE

defeatingexistence:

clockmocker:

A water balloon full of mercury hitting the ground (X)

SCIENCE

(via nou-ani-anquietas)

tonedgoals:

kkatkkrap:

winterinthetardis:

#firefox is experiencing a problem with windows

DAT CAPTION THO

I can’t. like I really just cannot 

(via jennysdoom)

elementals-ao3:

LOL - yes :P

elementals-ao3:

LOL - yes :P

(via seekingidlewild)